About

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My name is Jarrell Waggoner (ʤɛɹәl wægәnɹ̩, in IPA). I’m a developer and (presently) graduate student in Computer Science. I thrive on back end problems with an emphasis on big data and algorithms.

Over the years, I’ve been known as a programmer, developer, system administrator, researcher, student, instructor, tutor, film score composer, digital modeler/animator, image editor, video editor, film director, graphics designer, web developer, typesetter, and writer (technical and nontechnical), “The Oracle”, and probably other things as well. I love being a computing generalist, but more recently I have focused specifically on research and software development.

I love working on interesting problems, especially those that require specialized algorithms or involve large datasets. Feel free to email me to discuss anything that might vaguely fit into one of those categories.

What will you find here?

My interests are obscure and varied, though appreciation for film scores is my one pastime that has generated more useless trivia than any other. I occasionally dabble in the composition of film scores (in a rather amateur capacity), and I’ll soon endeavor to have a section dedicated to these experiments. Partly to score something, I assembled a movie edited entirely using free (libre) software.

I’ve been working with computer systems and software development over the last 1.5 decades. Arch Linux is my primary operating system, so many examples here will be targeted at this platform. I blog with code, and a large majority of what appears here is problem or code-driven.

Why malloc47?

malloc47 has been my internet handle since the mid-‘90s. Derived, quite simply, from the standard C command, malloc, and my favorite number, 47. Back in the dark ages before compilers were as widely-distributed, I longed for a C/C++ compiler with which I could move beyond the simple QBasic applications I had been coding, so I adopted the moniker largely out of the hope that I would get my hands on such a compiler. I did, and the name has stuck ever since.